Kanshudo Component Builder
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Draw a component:
Type a component or its name:
 
Choose from a list:
Change component list
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By default the Component Builder shows the most common Joyo kanji components (ie, components which are themselves Joyo kanji, or which are used in at least 3 other Joyo kanji). Select an alternative set of components below.



For details of all components and their English names, see the Component collections.
Kanshudo Component Builder Help
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For detailed instructions, see the Component builder how to guide.
To find any kanji, first try to identify the components it is made up of. Once you have identified any component, search for it in any of three ways:
  1. Draw it in the drawing area
  2. Type the name in the text area
  3. Look for it in the list
Example: look up 漢
  • Notice that 漢 is made of several components: 氵 艹 口 夫
  • Draw any of these components (one at a time) in the drawing area, and select it when you see it
  • Alternatively, look for a component in the list. 氵 艹 口 each have three strokes; 夫 has four strokes
  • If you know the meanings of the components, type any of them in the text area: water (氵), grass (艹), mouth (口) or husband (夫)
  • Keep adding components until you can see your kanji in the list of matches that appears near the top.
Kanshudo Component Builder Drawing Help
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The Kanshudo Component Builder can recognize any of the 416 components listed in the chart below the drawing area. Tips:
  • Draw a component in the center of the area, as large as you can
  • Try to draw the component as it appears in the kanji you're looking up
  • Don't worry about stroke order or number of strokes
  • Don't draw more than one component at a time
Not finding your component?
If you believe you've drawn your component correctly but the system is not recognizing it, please:
Let us know!

The Joy o' Kanji Essays

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accidentally
JOK: 1185
See how the disparate definitions of 偶 converge on one theme. Learn to discuss chance occurrences (e.g., "I happened to be in London then"). Find out about dogus, the otherworldly figurines that the ancient Japanese created, and see why people compare these statues to the Inuits. Also learn to talk about your idols, whether you adore Haruki Murakami or a North Korean dictator.
corner
JOK: 1187
Find out how the Japanese use 隅 not only literally but also figuratively, as when they talk about finding a refuge, feeling isolated, knowing something A to Z, nitpicking, and "lighting up the corner." Learn about a corner of Japan associated with an important strait, poetry, and scientific discoveries. Also find out about a fireworks festival in Tokyo. Enjoy several gorgeous book covers featuring 隅!
yield
JOK: 1188
In life, you must go with the flow sometimes but should "stand your ground" on other occasions. (Know when to fold them, know when to hold them, and all that.) Learn words about bending over - both literally (e.g., when putting on shoes) and metaphorically (e.g., when kowtowing to others).
dig
JOK: 1189
People use this kanji for digging up crops, excavating ruins, and mining; 掘 is quite grounded. But if you dig a little, you'll soon spot its figurative side. This essay will teach you to say "That old book is a real find" and "Someone rear-ended me." Through this kanji you'll find out about hidden treasure, an animal shaped like a tusk, and heating systems submerged in pits in the floor.
bless
JOK: 1196
In this essay, you'll learn to say "blessed with" (as in "She's blessed with intelligence and beauty") and to refer to people's wit, wisdom, and intelligence (all with the same word!). You'll also find out how to say that something (perhaps a dictionary or even the sun) is beneficial. But don't be under the impression that this kanji is only for positive thinking. It also enables you to talk about slick politicians, to complain that you're racking your brain, and to poke fun at your own natural laziness.
put up a sign
JOK: 1198
If you want to display things for all the world to see, this is the kanji for you! Find out how to talk about everything from Help Wanted signs and bulletin board notices to flags hoisted on flagpoles. Learn to say, "It came out in yesterday's paper." Come to understand the puzzling term "BBS.' Also learn to refer to the subject line of an email and to "aforementioned" comments.
meet
JOK: 1207
Eminently practical, 迎 plays a role in terms for shuttle buses, welcome parties, and phrases like "Your ride is here," "I'll come get you," and "I met her at the station." But you can also use 迎 to discuss pandering, an optical illusion at dawn, and autumn leaves at their peak. Moreover, 迎 has a strong link to death, as in the case of spirits who welcome you to the other world before you die.
whale
JOK: 1208
See how whales relate to cows, hippopotami, and boars. Learn anatomical terms from blubber to the blowhole. Discover why sperm whales are “incense whales” in Japanese, see what “the scent of dragon slobber” represents, and learn why 鬚 (beard) appears in important whale words. Find out about Osaka’s whalebone bridge, and learn how the Japanese talk about the whaling controversy.
shoulder
JOK: 1212
Your head rests on two good shoulders. The roads you travel on may have shoulders. Metaphorically, your shoulders help you carry the weight of burdens. Clearly, you need to know how to discuss shoulders. This essay will teach you key vocabulary and expressions related to this topic. You'll find out, for instance, what a tap on the shoulder means in Japan. Furthermore, you'll learn what the slope of shoulders indicates about someone's state of mind.
sword
JOK: 1214
This packed-to-the-gills essay teaches everything about the Japanese sword, from its connections to Buddhism and samurai to its metaphorical role. You'll learn how people use 剣 and 刀 quite differently. Fantastic photos provide glimpses of sword-bearing martial arts, supplementing the discussion of kendo. In one quiz, you'll even consider which animals come equipped with swords!
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