Kanshudo Component Builder
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Draw a component:
Type a component or its name:
 
Choose from a list:
Change component list
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By default the Component Builder shows the most common Joyo kanji components (ie, components which are themselves Joyo kanji, or which are used in at least 3 other Joyo kanji). Select an alternative set of components below.



For details of all components and their English names, see the Component collections.
Kanshudo Component Builder Help
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For detailed instructions, see the Component builder how to guide.
To find any kanji, first try to identify the components it is made up of. Once you have identified any component, search for it in any of three ways:
  1. Draw it in the drawing area
  2. Type the name in the text area
  3. Look for it in the list
Example: look up 漢
  • Notice that 漢 is made of several components: 氵 艹 口 夫
  • Draw any of these components (one at a time) in the drawing area, and select it when you see it
  • Alternatively, look for a component in the list. 氵 艹 口 each have three strokes; 夫 has four strokes
  • If you know the meanings of the components, type any of them in the text area: water (氵), grass (艹), mouth (口) or husband (夫)
  • Keep adding components until you can see your kanji in the list of matches that appears near the top.
Kanshudo Component Builder Drawing Help
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The Kanshudo Component Builder can recognize any of the 416 components listed in the chart below the drawing area. Tips:
  • Draw a component in the center of the area, as large as you can
  • Try to draw the component as it appears in the kanji you're looking up
  • Don't worry about stroke order or number of strokes
  • Don't draw more than one component at a time
Not finding your component?
If you believe you've drawn your component correctly but the system is not recognizing it, please:
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JOY O' KANJI

The Joy o' Kanji Essays

Welcome to Joy o’ Kanji, which will enable you to discover the joy of kanji! Below you’ll find introductions to detailed essays covering every aspect of each Jōyō kanji. Through loads of sample sentences and images containing the character in question, the essays give you the real-world experience you need so you can master kanji. You can download the essays in PDF form. After reading them, you can play games and use flashcards to work with the vocabulary and sentences from the essay.
If a Joy o' Kanji essay is available for a kanji, you will see this badge next to it in search results.
You can also find all kanji with essays available using the special search keyword jokessay:true, and if you know the Joy o' Kanji ID (the number under the kanji in the display below), you can use the special keyword jok:1009.
These essays come from our partner, Joy o' Kanji.
More info about Joy o' Kanji
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can
JOK: 1095
The yomi most often used for 缶 is KAN. How perfect is that for a kanji that means 'can'?! That isn't entirely a rhetorical question. Really, why is the yomi such a perfect match for the English word? This seemingly straightforward question has anything but a straightforward answer. Find out about this, as well as ways to speak about canned food, canned beverages, and "canned" people (which is not to say that they've been fired or that they're trite!). Learn about 缶 as a radical, too!
fall into
JOK: 1098
Collapsed land. The fall of a city in wartime. Defective cars. Holes in theories. Framing and trapping people. Becoming psychologically or economically depressed. With 陥 you can talk about all these things, as well as saying, “That eventually put him in a very awkward position,” “The news plunged people into distress,” and “Small businesses are feeling the squeeze of inflation.”
endure
JOK: 1104
Explore two interrelated on-yomi and four stunningly similar kun-yomi for 堪. These readings enable you to say, “I can’t take this anymore,” “Let’s hang in there till help comes,” “The cottage will not withstand strong winds,” “I’m dying to see her,” and much more. Find out how the rhetorical question “How can I put up with it if I lose?!” really conveys the bold statement “I will never lose.”
lenient
JOK: 1110
Old copper coins with square holes. The fossilized hipbone of an elephant. Having a generous, benevolent, and magnanimous disposition. Letting your hair down and making yourself at home. Feeling uncomfortable with strangers. Being tolerant of diversity and open to various religions. Begging for forgiveness. Going easy on people.... All of these concepts connect to 寛. Find out how!
remorse
JOK: 1113
After reading this essay, you'll be able to understand scripted apologies devoid of sincerity; lambast something as "utterly deplorable"; say, "Your behavior leaves much to be desired"; and differentiate grudges fueled by resentment from those fueled by regret. You'll also know how the poet Basho made a region complain about its gloominess and how a piano prodigy publicized his regrets.
starving
JOK: 1127
Learn to talk about literal hunger, saying things such as “A slice of bread was not enough to satisfy his hunger” and “I would rather starve to death than steal.” Also find out how to speak of it figuratively, as with “a hunger for adventure” and “starving for conversation.” Encounter a saying about a starving dog’s mentality, and see how the Japanese talk about bloodthirsty beings.
ogre
JOK: 1128
The oni (鬼), the Japanese devil or demon, is elusive. It's hard to find images of this supernatural creature at temples or elsewhere in Japan. On the other hand, devils and demons work their way into our lives much more than we might realize. In Japanese, 鬼 references are pervasive. Find out when 鬼 is a term of endearment and when it's an insult. Learn about a folktale (in which Momotaro travels to Devil's Island) and the holiday called Setsubun. Finally, see how 鬼 functions as a radical or component in several Joyo kanji.
shine
JOK: 1132
This kanji will make your eyes sparkle with joy! Using 輝, you can discuss the shining moon, shoes that gleam, and buildings ablaze with lights. You can also use 輝く figuratively to talk about shining in public speaking and living a radiant life with a brilliant future. Find out how to say “She has glossy hair,” “A meal without wine is like a day without sunshine,” and “I noticed a glint in her eyes.”
equestrian
JOK: 1133
Find out about a Japanese tradition of shooting at archery targets from galloping horses. Learn the courteous rituals samurai engaged in before killing each other. See what "white knight" means to Japanese businesspeople. Also discover a theory linking the Japanese and Mongols, a military term related to dragons, and a word relevant both to controlling a horse and to nigiri sushi.
best regards
JOK: 1134
With 宜 we can talk about timing (e.g., We provide timely information), convenience (e.g., For convenience I’m including everyone on this email), and suitability (e.g., Do as you see fit). The kanji also pops up in greetings (e.g., Say hello to your sister for me), phrases about permission (e.g., May I come and see you tomorrow?), and advice (e.g., It would be better to tear it down).
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